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Practical Considerations For Microservice Architectures

  • Sam Newman
  • 00:44:39

So you’ve heard about the buzz behind Microservices and finer-grained architectures in general? Microservice architectures can lead to easier to change, more maintainable systems which can be more secure, performant and stable than previous designs.

But what are the practical concerns associated with running more fine-grained systems, and what are the new things you’ll need to know if you want to embrace the power of smaller services without the new sources of complexity making your life a nightmare?

This talk will delve deeper into the characteristics of well-behaved services, and will define some clear principles your services should follow. It will also discuss in more depth some of the challenges associated with managing and monitoring more complex distributed systems. We’ll discuss how you can design services to be more fault-tolerant, what technologies may exist in your own platform to get you started. We’ll end by giving some pointers as to when you should consider microservice architectures, and how you should go about introducing them in your own organisation.

  • Sam Newman is a technical consultant at ThoughtWorks, where he has been for over nine years. He has worked with a variety of companies in multiple domains in the UK, Australia and the US. If you asked him what he does, he’d say ‘I work with people to build better software systems’. He has written articles of O’Reilly, presented at conferences, and sporadically commits to open source projects. While Java used to be his bread and butter, he also spends lots of time with Ruby, Python, Javascript, and Clojure, Infrastructure Automation and Cloud systems.

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