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Programming In Time - Live Coding for Creative Performances

  • Andrew Sorensen
  • 00:38:15

The act of programming is typically removed from a program’s ongoing execution, both temporally and spatially. This is particularly true for real-time systems, where the system’s operation is often tightly coupled with the physical environment. This talk aims to challenge this separation by looking at programming as the ongoing orchestration of real-time processes through time - an ongoing cyber-physical dialogue between the programmer, the machine and the environment.

After a very brief history of live coding Andrew’s talk will delve into some of the deeper technical issues surrounding this challenging domain.

Using Andrew’s Extempore system, this talk will explore notions of time, liveness, feedback and procedural orchestration, addressing these ideas from the perspective of both end-user programmers as well as system designers.

  • Andrew Sorensen is an artist-programmer whose interests lie at the intersection of computer science and creative practice. Andrew is well known for creating the programming languages that he uses in live performance to generate improvised audiovisual theatre. He has been invited to perform these contemporary audiovisual improvisations around the world. Andrew is a Senior Research Fellow at the Queensland University of Technology and is the author of the Impromptu and Extempore programming language environments.

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